Month: October 2015

Watch this: “Color Brave” Ted Talk

Us white people love to say that we are color blind. What we mean is that we aren’t racist–or at least strive not to be–and that we don’t judge people based on the color of their skin. “I don’t see black or white–I just see people,” someone might say. And I understand where that sentiment comes from, having thought it myself. I get it. I like to think that I don’t judge people on the color of their skin, so therefore race is not an issue to me. But, therein lies the problem–saying that you have to be color blind to appreciate Black people is saying that black skin is not the same as white skin. See where I’m going here? What we should be saying is that we are color brave. That we see Black people and their beautiful black skin and value it every bit as much as our white skin. We don’t have to be “blind” to skin color to treat everyone the same. There are Black people and there are white people and a million shades in between. It’s …

Race Relations: The power of caring

It feels like hardly a day goes by that I don’t see something racist in the news or online, whether it’s something truly tragic like a shooting or something a little less tragic, but still terrible, such as online bullying. This week, a white guy named Gerod Roth from Atlanta posted a selfie with a beautiful Black child on his Facebook page. Disgustingly, it was soon riddled with racist remarks from both the poster and his friends and it ended up being passed all over the internet. The Black community in Atlanta and around the country was outraged, and the people behind Black Twitter dug up the guy’s personal information and he and at least one of the commenters ended up being fired from their jobs. I read about this in an article on the Atlanta Black Star website and, like other people who read it, was upset by the photo and comments on the guys’ Facebook page. Then I scrolled down to the comments section and read what Black people were saying–and that made me feel even worse. Things like, “White …